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Electronic Muscle Stimulation

This is an electronic muscle stimulator circuit that stimulates nerves of that part of your body where electrodes are attached. It is useful to relieve headache and muscle pain and revive frozen muscles that impair movement. It’s mainly muscle stimulation aid is removing cellulitis and build up you muscles.
Can be used for diy electro stimulation.

The system comprises two units: muscle stimulator and timer.
Fig. 1 shows the circuit of the muscle stimulator. IC 7555 is wired as an astable multivibrator to generate about 80Hz pulses.

Using potentiometer VR1 you can control the intensity of current sensing at the electrodes. The brightness level of LED1 indicates the amplitude of the pulses. If you want to increase the intensity level, replace the 1.8kΩ resistor with 5.6kΩ or higher value up to 10kΩ.

X1 is a small mains transformer with 220V primary to 12V, 100/150mA secondary. It must be reverse connected, i.e., connect the secondary winding to the collector of T2 and ground, and primary winding to the output electrodes. The output voltage is about 60V but the output current is so small that there is no threat of electric shock.

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Schematic of the DIY Muscle Stimulator Circuit

electronic muscle stimulator circuit schematic

Electrodes are made of small, thinguage metallic plates measuring about 2.5×2.5 cm2 in size. Use flexible wires to solder electrodes and connect to the output of the device. Before attaching metal electrodes to the body, wipe them with a damp cloth.
After attaching the electrodes to the body (with the help of elastic bands on velcro straps), flip switch S1 to activate the circuit and rotate the knob of intensity-control preset VR1 very slowly until you feel a slight tingling sensation.

Fig. 2 shows the timer circuit. It uses IC NE555 wired in monostable mode. Initially, when you press switch S2, the monostable triggers and its output goes high for 10 minutes. Thereafter, its output goes low to give a beep sound from the piezobuzzer and lights up the red LED (LED2) indicating that muscle stimulation time is over.

Schematic of the Electronic Muscle Stimulation Timer

muscle stimulator timer

Assemble the timer with a separate switch and a 9V DC battery in the same cabinet as the stimulator. Tape the electrodes to the skin at opposite ends of the chosen muscle and rotate VR1 knob slowly until you sense light itching when the muscle stimulation circuit is powered on. At the same time, flip switch S2 to start the timer for counting the time. At the end of the timing cycle, the piezobuzzer beeps. Each session should last about 10 minutes.

Caution: Heart patients and pregnant women should not use this device. Also, do not attach electrodes to burns, cuts, wounds or any injury. Consult your physician before using this circuit.

48 Comments

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  • harvey joel caceres

    I will put your name in acknowledgement so that I can thanks you.

  • harvey joel caceres

    I need your knowledge about this one.We are required to make a thesis about this one.Can you please instruct me how these device constructed and other important facts I need to know.Hope for your great reply.

  • harvey joel caceres

    I need your knowledge aWe are required to make a thesis about this one.Can you please instruct me how these device constructed and other important facts I need to know.Hope for your great reply.

  • harvey joel caceres

    I need your knowledge about this idea. We are required to make a thesis about this one.Can you please instruct me how these device constructed and other important facts I need to know.Hope for your great reply.I will write your name in acknowledgement so that I can thank you.

  • harvey joel caceres

    Can you help me please help me about this. I need your knowledge about this idea. We are required to make a thesis about this one.Can you please instruct me how these device constructed and other important facts I need to know.Hope for your great reply.I will write your name in acknowledgement so that I can thank you.

  • ranjit

    hai, i did this ckt ……….bt not working, is there any changes want to made? pls reply

  • Josh

    Be wary of using everyday materials for the electrode plates. Ion transfer occurs through electropotential. You could be transferring all kinds of nasty stuff into your skin. There is a reason why most of the fda approved systems use primarily silver or silver alloys for their electrodes. Be careful people. And for god sake, don’t try to use the system anywhere near essential organs or their neural pathways like the neck, head, chest (around the heart area), across the spinal chord (unless its a TENS system with a specific purpose), etc. The results can be catastrophic.

  • Danny

    This circuit does not work! First of all the first transistor does not succeed in pulling the second one into conduction. Connecting the second transistor directly to the 7555 does work, but then the oscillating frequency of the 7555 (around 80Hz) is way too fast for the coil of the transformer to charge. Result: you feel nothing. Also the LED in parallel over the coil draws too much current away from the coil.
    Solution: leave out LED, increase 100nF cap to around 3 uF, use a higher battery voltage if needed. 3V will give you practically nothing. Also clever to decouple 7555 from shorting battery (caused by transistor switching DC to coil of transformer), by using a 1N4007 diode just before power connections to 7555, (cathode connected to 7555 pin 4 and 8, and an elco of about 47uF or higher from cathode to gnd, thus providing power supply buffering to 7555 and filtering out voltage drops which might deregulate oscillation of 7555).

    • Rankangkah

      There is no reason why the first transistor (T1) won’t make the second one (T2) to conduct, check if your VR1 is not open from wiper, T2 is supposed to detect the voltage drop that T1 cause on R3 and VR1 thus amplifying voltage the wave is also inverted. 80Hz is not necessary high for a transformer just 20 or 30 Hz higher that most transformers are made to use. The LED current is limited enough by R4 you can try a 200Ω resistor specially if you use a higher supply voltage.
      I remember doing a similar circuit to that if not an equal copy to that one, then I modded it, if I remember correctly I changed R1 to 100KΩ and putting a 100KΩ potentiometer in series with R1, that will vary the frequency, then I changed R2 to 1KΩ and put a 10kΩ potentiometer in series with R2, that will vary the pulse width needed to move muscles.(putting the electrodes from under my wrist to the opposite side of my elbow and polarity matters too!) I was able to make my fingers move with it but not other muscles, probably I needed more supply voltage, however that circuit does not provide bipolar electricity which would be more efficient for muscle stimulation, that circuit is only a TENS.

    • Marius

      Hi Danny, thanks for the feedback, we really appreciate this.

  • soe

    hai.. iam doing dis project.. i hav finished doing dis.. can sumbody send me design values for dis project..

  • Sia

    hi,

    i am currently doing a project on the above topic, how reliable is the circuit above! and what type of electrodes are required to make it work more effectively?

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